Old Apricot

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  • #189086
    chrissy T

    Old Apricot
     
    Old Apricot is the one to grow for reliable heavy tiered flushes of nicely fragrant fuss free Flowers.
     
    Next to Knightii, it is the most well known and one of the oldest cultivars we have here in Australia.
    I have grown my Old Apricot for over 15 years so I know how tough it is. Ask any Aussie Brugmansia grower what they think of it, they all will agree that it’s a must in every Brugmansia garden. It’s colour is a strong trait in it’s progeny which is a bonus for most of us. All the cuttings strike easily (I have shared dozens). Even when frozen to the ground it always comes back.

    This pic was taken by Wayne Carter.
     
     

    image.jpg

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    #189085
    M. Gail

    Beautifully wonderful, Chrissy.  Am I right in thinking that this one is only in Australia?

    #189091
    Keymaster
    Alvin

    We think so (?????)

     

    There is a tiny bit of speculation that ‘Tommie Lockwood’   MIGHT be a different name for the same plant but it would require DNA analysis to prove or disprove this.

    #189093
    M. Gail

    Thanks, Al, so glad I have a small TL.

    #189116
    Keymaster
    ShaunQ

    Old Apricot is one of those plants that I have had for more then 20 years

    I found at the start that it was a slow bloomer but once it gets there it’s like a cannon and goes off!!

    It can be in flush with over 120 blooms the fragrance is mild

    It’s tough as old boots and has little issue with bugs

    HIGHLY RECOMMENDED FOR ALL COLLECTION

    #189132
    M. Gail

    We think so (?????)

     

    There is a tiny bit of speculation that ‘Tommie Lockwood’   MIGHT be a different name for the same plant but it would require DNA analysis to prove or disprove this.

    Okay, to add to the mystery.  I’m finding that ‘Tommie Lockwood’ loves his water.  While my plant is young, he’s requiring

    considerable more compared to others that have been in the same environment, at a similar stage, and has all season. 

    Is this in line with ‘Old Apricot’s’ needs/habits?

    #189136
    Keymaster
    Alvin

    I’m not too sure now.  Even thought each of our climates, conditions, & soils must make a HUGE difference, Shaun says TL is “a slow bloomer but once it gets there it’s like a cannon and goes off!!”   & that  ”the fragrance is mild”.    My cutting of TL from Dan (Rudy) bloomed early, often, & regularly and it is one of the most fragrant out there.

    Maybe they are not the same after all ?????   But then again, they might be. :smiley-dunno: 

    #189139
    chrissy T

    That isn’t my experience of it Al, the first flush on my cutting grown Old Apricot was huge and quick to bloom, with so many flowers I couldn’t count.

     

    The perfume is lovely. My original plant is has a trunk like a tree now.

    People perceive perfumes in a different way.

     

    If Old Apricot isn’t Tommie Lockwood then it sure is a doppelganger 🙂

     

    chrissy

    #189144
    M. Gail

    Well, maybe we should pool our pennies together and get a DNA testing.  On the other hand,

    doesn’t someone know a sister, uncle, auntie, student that would do it for a passionate

    cause?

    #189156
    Dianne

    Ditto to the way that Chrissy’s OA grew, only mine has 9 trunks….it sends them up as fast as I prune them out…

    #196809
    mickeyk

    why prune them the more trunk the more flowers

    #196810
    Dianne

    Old Apricot would turn into a thicket of old gnarly trunks, Mickey.

    I prefer young, healthy growth and OA seems to appreciate it, this way it stays the size that I want it to, about 8 ft wide.

    #196837
    mickeyk

    we need pictures to prove how happy it is , I always wanted one but don’t know if anyone In the USA has ONe , but I do have Tommie Lockwood that looks like it is ready to start blooming for the first time soon

     sounds like a plant that would be easy to spread around , grows fast and easy to root , good breeding stock

    #196842
    Dianne

     Here it is before it was pruned and a couple of trunks removed last September…

    The next pic is it in summer, it’s beautiful isn’t it.

    You are correct saying that it is a good plant to spread around and we have, it’s everywhere.

     

    Its most unlikely that it is anywhere but Australia, but you never know.

     

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