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Garlic Planting Time


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#1 Alvin

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 01:48 PM

It'll be October soon. Time to think about planting fall bulbs. Hyacinths, Tulip, Daffodil, Crocus, Frittilarias, Garlic, all kinds of bulbs are best planted in the fall once the hot weather is over.
I'm going to take my time this fall (instead of procrastinating) and start planting my garlic a little bit earlier than I usually do, so I can plant a leisurly few rows each week and make a little experiment out of it. I always hope to learn something. If I manage to avoid the massive November backache too, that will be a pleasant side effect.
I have planted garlic as late as mid-december and still had a very good crop, but my soil always gets enough snow cover to keep it from freezing. The ground stays soft and moist all winter under the snow and the garlic's root systems grow slowly, but steadily all winter long. If your soil is exposed and freezes during your winter, I would suggest planting sooner rather than later to give the root systems time to develope before the soil does freeze.
Today, I started the process.

  • Evacuate most of the weeds and rototill the soil as deep as possible. I believe that the FLUFFIER the soil, the better.
  • Prepare your planting stock by breaking apart the individual cloves and set aside the small ones (like the one on the left). The small ones taste as good as the big ones, so I'll be roasting all the little ones a bit later. Plant the biggest ones. It doesn't matter a bit if the 'paper' comes off the clove or stays on.
  • You can plant them in a single row if you wish, but I have found that I can grow them in a double row just as happily so I space them just far enough apart top allow my favorite weed hoe to get in between them. The are about 16-18 inch aisles between the double rows.
  • Then I simply poke the cloves right-side-up (point up - scar down) into the fluffy soil so the base is about 3-4 inches deep and I don't bother to smooth out the soil. Rain will catch in the mini divots my hand leaves and you won't see any hint of the divots come spring anyway.
  • I label the row and move on. I try to avoid compacting the soil once the bulbs are planted.
  • ignore then all winter.  (My favorite part)  Then, come spring, when the snow melts, they will be up like the tulips.
  • When the leaves go yellow - then start to brown in mid-summer, I dig them up & hang them out of the sun to dry out & cure.G1.JPG G3.JPG G5.JPG G7.JPG G8.JPG G9.JPG Garlic April21.jpg LA-Sib2015b.JPG Hrvst7-1-12b.JPG

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#2 chrissy T

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 01:11 AM

Oh yummy ! how many are you planting ? :3d-bird:
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#3 Alvin

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 01:32 AM

About 2500 with any luck.
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#4 EKANAGRAM

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 11:57 AM

Which reminds me! My garlic stash is getting low! I might try this. Since you sent me that last batch, AL - I've been eating garlic every day and loving it!
I've also ramped up my ingestion of both Frankincense, Myrrh and raw Papaya.
Feeling better all the time.
Thank you again!

Edited by EKANAGRAM, 24 September 2011 - 11:59 AM.

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#5 Edna

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 09:10 PM

I absolutely love the taste of garlic. I love to smell it and eat it. I can't eat it any more because for some reason I can't get the taste out of mouth for about a week. It just stays there and drives me crazy. Recon it's an old age thing ?:smiley-dunno:

OMG I just realized you said 2500.... Posted Image
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#6 Alvin

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 08:34 AM

That's how I feel about people that preserve quarts upon quarts of tomatoes, Edna! I simply don't have the patience to handle that many and spend that much time over boiling water in the kitchen! LOL!
But the garlic DOES come out of the pores for a few days & that's what helps de-toxify. Cures what ails you! Better than snake oil! :bowing boys:
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#7 chrissy T

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    I am just a home gardener that like most of you fell in love with Brugs and wanted some variety in Australia there was not much.

Posted 25 September 2011 - 03:10 PM

Chewing on Parsley or Cardamon helps with that problem Edna. :frogs10:
Chlorophyll tablets and powder does too .
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#8 Alvin

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 03:36 PM

Or fennel seeds.

or ice cream!


Or brownies


Or - -

sorry - got carried away there.
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#9 Edna

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 04:04 PM

I choose ice cream Al ... LOL
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#10 Dawna

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Posted 26 September 2011 - 06:24 AM

Looking good Al!!!!

In our Sunday's paper there is an insert called Relish. You can go to their site WWW.RELISH.COM



3 weeks ago they had a segment on growing garlic. Some nice small tidbits of how some people turned into garlic farmers exclusively and how they market it.

We just had the Garlic Festival down in Mystic and I missed it. I was working!!!!!! GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR>>>>>>>>>>>
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#11 Dawna

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 06:23 AM

Other than compost do you fertilize your garlic patch?



I'm never going to get mine planted! Everytime I go to till it rains. I'm halfway there and it's going to rain again.

This is really strange for me trying to plant stuff in October. October is the month that I normally dread. Frost, hauling stuff in. What a weird feeling to be planting something in the ground. LOL!
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#12 Alvin

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 07:54 AM

Nope. I have never fed my garlic anything (except the compost).

It IS odd in a way; isn't it? Planting in the fall.
I really hate cleaning all the old squash vines & frosted tomato & kale plants etc. out too.
I find it refreshing to plant garlic & know that I won't have to water it, weed it, even think about it until spring.
The other thing I like is that the timing is nowhere near as important or rushed as spring planting is. Put it off for a few weeks & you're still OK. Don't worry about timing. Any time between now & when the ground freezes should be OK.
The rains can't last forever. (Sure hope not)
Oh, if you're gouing to oven-roast any tomatoes, throw in a couple small cloves of fresh garlic too.
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#13 alpha

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 09:58 AM

Al, your garlic garden is amazing.

I would so love to do what you are doing, however I don't have enough space in my yard, however I'd love to do a small patch.

What varieties of garlic do you grow?
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#14 Dawna

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 11:51 AM

Here's a new one for you Al. What do you do with pickled garlic anyway? Eat it straight out of the jar????? http://www.food.com/...ot-pepper-13126

Someone on ebay is selling Polish Hardneck in large quanties. Till more soil Al. More Garlic!
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#15 Alvin

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Posted 04 October 2011 - 01:34 PM

Polish Hardneck should be good too. I remember having grown one called Polish something. I think it was very good if I recall correctly.

I think(hope) that I'll have just enough of my own stock to fill up my garden this year. I've only got half of it planted so far.

Ingrid - I don't honestly know what variety it is that I grow. An old gardener in nearby Lake Ann gave me a start of it thirty-some years ago. I have bought & grown over a dozen other named hardneck varieties side-by-side thinking it might be one of them, but the stuff I grow always has wider & more curved leaves, curlier scape-stalks, bigger bulbs, better flavor, & lasts longer, so I gave up trying to ID it. I also gave up growing the other varieties. (Why bother?)

Hopefully, I will have lots of it next summer & will be able to spread it around better.
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#16 Dawna

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 04:53 AM

The Polish variety is known for it's long time storage. I hope it's true.


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#17 Alvin

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Posted 05 October 2011 - 04:56 AM

Are you getting some Polish Hardneck to grow, Dawna?

#18 Dawna

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Posted 06 October 2011 - 07:00 AM

I ordered some to plant and eat also.

Just received it yesterday. The bulbs are huge! Haven't experimented with the cooking end yet. Will be doing that on Saturday night. Can't wait to try it.

My family loves garlic and since we tryed yours they all say there is a huge difference between store bought softneck and fresh hardneck.




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#19 Dawna

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 05:53 AM

I got 200 in the ground this weekend with the girls. We have another 100 to get into the ground this week.

I wish I took pictures of us in the beginning. We took a metal bar and tryed pushing it into the ground to have perfect holes and a tape measure for perfect measurement. That lasted for one row. LOL!!!!! We would have been planting for weeks if we continued with this method.

I'm thinking of using shredded leaves as mulch on ours. Have you ever tryed this? I can't locate any straw. I know you don't mulch but I have a big fear of grasses trying to take over next spring.
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#20 Alvin

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Posted 10 October 2011 - 08:06 AM

I always have enough snow that I never worry about mulching mine in order to prevent the soil from freezing or heaving. All the 'books' say you 'must' mulch garlic, but the only year I ever did it, i bought clean straw and spent a lot of time mulching, but my grass came up from under the mulch and the mulch hid & protected the grass until it was well-established and then it became a major pain in the buttocks trying to get the grass out. I would think that fall leaves would be infinitely better as a mulch and a LOT easier to deal with. (AND FREE)
Or you could make a experiment out of it & mulch a portion and leave some of it un-mulched.
It sounds like you're going to have enough to play with!!!
MMMWWUUAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!
Have you labelled your different varieties??
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